COMPUTER CHRONICLES REVISITED, PART 36 — TOPVIEW AND CONCURRENT PC DOS

One late night in the summer of 1972, an electrical engineering graduate student at the University of Washington named Tom Rolander was working in the school’s computer science lab when he saw a “fellow who looked like a student” sporting red hair and wearing cutoffs enter the room.

COMPUTER CHRONICLES REVISITED, PART 35 — MACPROJECT, FILEVISION, GEM, AND LOTUS JAZZ

David Bunnell, a previous guest of Computer Chronicles, was well known in the mid-1980s as the publisher of PC World and Macworld magazines.

COMPUTER CHRONICLES REVISITED SPECIAL NO. 2 — JIM WARREN

Although Stewart Cheifet is long remembered as the host and executive producer of Computer Chronicles, he was actually not the first person to host the program.

COMPUTER CHRONICLES REVISITED, PART 34 — DOLLARS AND SENSE, BANK OF AMERICA'S HOMEBANKING, AND TAX PREPARER BY HOWARDSOFT

The debut of VisiCalc in 1979 is often considered the first “killer app” for the personal computer.

COMPUTER CHRONICLES REVISITED SPECIAL NO. 1 — THE ELIZABETH ARDEN BEAUTY COMPUTER

From time to time, I’ll be posting these “Special” blogs, which only indirectly relate back to a Computer Chronicles episode.

COMPUTER CHRONICLES REVISITED, PART 33 — STEVE BOROS, SPORTSPAK, COMPUTENNIS CT120, AND THE CONVERSE BIOMECHANICS LAB

Michael Lewis’ 2003 book Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game described Oakland Athletics general manager Billy Beane’s use of advanced statistical analysis–known as sabermetrics–to build his team.

COMPUTER CHRONICLES REVISITED, PART 32 — UNIX SYSTEM V SVR 2, BSD 4.2, AND THE HP INTEGRAL PC

In 1969, a computer scientist at Bell Labs named Ken Thompson wrote an operating system for a Digital Equipment Corporation PDP-7 minicomputer that he initially dubbed Unics.

COMPUTER CHRONICLES REVISITED, PART 31 — THE ADAPTIVE FIRMWARE CARD, EXPRESS 3, AND KURZWEIL READING MACHINE

Up to this point on Computer Chronicles–we’re now at February 1985 in terms of broadcast dates–the featured computers have largely relied on typewriter-style keyboards as input devices and cathode-ray tube monitors for output.

COMPUTER CHRONICLES REVISITED, PART 30 — THE DATA GENERAL-ONE, TI PRO-LITE, HP 110 PORTABLE, AND MORROW PIVOT

Although Paul Schindler’s commentary comes at the end of the episode just before “Random Access,” I thought I’d discuss his thoughts upfront this time as it helps provide some useful context for this early January 1985 episode, which is about portable computers.

COMPUTER CHRONICLES REVISITED, PART 29 — LOCKSMITH, PC-TALK, AND FRANKIE MOUSE

In the last episode, Wendy Woods mentioned that during her testing of IBM PC software compatibility with the PCjr that only the version of Borland’s Sidekick without copy protection worked with the latter machine.