Computer Chronicles Revisited, Part 21 — The Apple Graphics Tablet, SGI IRIS 1400, and Quantel Paintbox

Computer Chronicles Revisited, Part 21 — The Apple Graphics Tablet, SGI IRIS 1400, and Quantel Paintbox

Personal computers of the early 1980s were often limited to just a few colors for on-screen graphics. The Apple IIe, for example, could display up to 16 colors at one time depending on the screen resolution. And of course, no home computer of this era could produce genuine 3D graphics. That capability was limited to very high-end machines designed for industrial or commercial use. The Special Talents of Computer Graphics Which brings us to our next Computer Chronicles episode from 1984.
Computer Chronicles Revisited, Part 20 — Expert-Ease and the KEE System

Computer Chronicles Revisited, Part 20 — Expert-Ease and the KEE System

In Part 14 of this series, the Computer Chronicles first discussed the subject of “expert systems.” This referred to computer knowledge bases that purported to replicate a human’s expertise in a particular field. This next Chronicles episode revisits the idea of expert systems as part of a broader discussion of artificial intelligence. The Link Between the Mechanical World and Abstract Concepts Herbert Lechner is back as Stewart Cheifet’s co-host for this episode.
Computer Chronicles Revisited, Part 19 — The HP 2700 and the Apple Macintosh

Computer Chronicles Revisited, Part 19 — The HP 2700 and the Apple Macintosh

When Apple released the Macintosh–later known as the Macintosh 128K–in January 1984, its main selling point was the graphical user interface (GUI). Although the original Macintosh operating system’s GUI was largely based on what Apple deployed on the Lisa a year earlier, the company believed the new machine’s lower price point would make the interface more accessible to a larger audience. Of course, the Macintosh was not exactly cheap, even by 1984 personal computer standards.
Computer Chronicles Revisited, Part 18 — Personal COBOL, Forth, and DR Logo

Computer Chronicles Revisited, Part 18 — Personal COBOL, Forth, and DR Logo

In Part 16, we saw a demonstration of Apple Logo, a computer programming language promoted as an alternative to BASIC. This next episode of The Computer Chronicles features another version of Logo–this one developed and sold by co-host Gary Kildall’s Digital Research–as well as a broader discussion of the state of computer programming languages around early 1984. The other languages presented in this episode–COBOL, Forth, and Pascal–are still in use today, even if they are not necessarily at the top of the Stack Overflow survey of most popular programming languages.
Computer Chronicles Revisited, Part 17 — Alan Shugart and the Memorex 3680

Computer Chronicles Revisited, Part 17 — Alan Shugart and the Memorex 3680

John Siracusa, one of the hosts of the Accidental Tech Podcast, is often credited with citing the “infinite timescale” problem when it comes to predicting when a new technology will arrive. The infinite timescale–a somewhat inaccurate description coined by one of Siracusa’s co-hosts, Marco Arment–essentially refers to the notion, “We all agree that this thing will happen at some point in the future, but it won’t happen this year, or next year, or the year after that…but it’s going to happen eventually.
Computer Chronicles Revisited, Part 16 — The Apple Logo Programming Language

Computer Chronicles Revisited, Part 16 — The Apple Logo Programming Language

Today, Python is probably the most popular computer programming language taught in elementary and secondary schools. (There’s even a terrific podcast, Teaching Python, on this subject.) But back in the 1980s, BASIC was the language of choice for many introductory computer classrooms. Specifically, versions of Microsoft BASIC came with many popular 8-bit microcomputers, including the Apple II and Commodore 64, which were also commonly used in schools at the time.
Computer Chronicles Revisited, Part 15 — Space Shuttle, Excalibur, Pinball Construction Set, and Dr. J vs. Larry Bird

Computer Chronicles Revisited, Part 15 — Space Shuttle, Excalibur, Pinball Construction Set, and Dr. J vs. Larry Bird

Even if you’re only a casual gamer, there are probably a few video game designers whose names you’re familiar with, such as Sid Meier, Todd Howard, and Shigeru Miyamoto. From the early days of computer gaming, there was a concerted effort to promote certain “superstar” designers to help personalize and sell games to the public. This next episode of The Computer Chronicles featured three such designers from the early 1980s, as well as an executive whose name would become synonymous with computer and video game production in the decades that followed.
Computer Chronicles Revisited, Part 14 — Express EasyScan and The Sales Edge

Computer Chronicles Revisited, Part 14 — Express EasyScan and The Sales Edge

In a bit of eerie foreshadowing, this episode of The Computer Chronicles from January 1984 opened with a discussion of a global pandemic. Not a real one, of course, but a computer simulation. Stewart Cheifet and Gary Kildall played with a game called Epidemic, released by Strategic Simulations. Cheifet explained this was an example of how someone could use a computer to choose among alternatives, make a decision, and establish a complex strategy for solving a problem.
Computer Chronicles Revisited, Part 13 — The IBM PROFS (and the Macintosh)

Computer Chronicles Revisited, Part 13 — The IBM PROFS (and the Macintosh)

The episode I’m covering today taped on January 18, 1984, which was four days before Super Bowl XVIII. That game would go down in computing history for the famous Apple “1984” commercial that announced the launch of the original Macintosh (later known as the Macintosh 128K). As this Chronicles episode aired the week after the Super Bowl, Stewart Cheifet devoted a good portion of the post-show “Random Access” segment to the new machine and what it might mean for Apple for the rest of 1984.
Computer Chronicles Revisited, Part 12 — The Xerox Color Laser Printer

Computer Chronicles Revisited, Part 12 — The Xerox Color Laser Printer

Today’s episode contains what Stewart Cheifet would later describe as one of the classic “near disasters” involving a product demonstration on The Computer Chronicles. The subject was the first Xerox Color Laser Printer, which was actually a prototype not yet available for sale when this Chronicles episode taped in October 1983. Cheifet recounted the event to Tonya Hall of ZDNet in a November 2020 interview: We introduced the very first color laser printer on the show by Xerox.