David Murray

Computer Chronicles Revisited, Part 21 — The Apple Graphics Tablet, SGI IRIS 1400, and Quantel Paintbox

Computer Chronicles Revisited, Part 21 — The Apple Graphics Tablet, SGI IRIS 1400, and Quantel Paintbox

Personal computers of the early 1980s were often limited to just a few colors for on-screen graphics. The Apple IIe, for example, could display up to 16 colors at one time depending on the screen resolution. And of course, no home computer of this era could produce genuine 3D graphics. That capability was limited to very high-end machines designed for industrial or commercial use. The Special Talents of Computer Graphics Which brings us to our next Computer Chronicles episode from 1984.
Computer Chronicles Revisited, Part 9 — The VOTAN V5000 and the Speech Plus CallText

Computer Chronicles Revisited, Part 9 — The VOTAN V5000 and the Speech Plus CallText

David Murray, who goes by The 8-Bit Guy on YouTube, had a great video a couple of years back on “How Speech Synthesizers Work." He explained that early devices like the Texas Instruments “Speak & Spell” were not true speech synthesizers, as they relied on a limited vocabulary of pre-recorded words. But even in the mid-1980s there were speech synthesizers that could build words out of basic sounds. Today’s episode of The Computer Chronicles from early 1984 also examined the status of speech synthesis during this time period.